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Procarin - TransDermal Histamine
In Multiple Sclerosis

  1. Procarin - transdermal Histamine in Multiple Sclerosis: Part I - clinical experience
    Altern Med Rev 1999 Dec;4(6):424-428

  2. Transdermal Histamine in Multiple Sclerosis, Part Two: A proposed theoretical basis for its use
    Altern Med Rev 2000 Jun;5(3):224-248




#1

Procarin - TransDermal Histamine In Multiple Sclerosis

Part I - Clinical Experience
Gillson G, Wright JV, DeLack E, Ballasiotes G
Altern Med Rev 1999 Dec;4(6):424-428
Tahoma Clinic, Nutritional Medicine,
Tahoma Clinic, 515 West Harrison, Kent, WA 98032

PMID# 10608915
Abstract

Histamine has a long history of therapeutic use in many diseases, including Multiple Sclerosis (MS). Recently, transdermal Histamine has been successfully employed for the amelioration of symptoms of both Relapsing/Remitting And Progressive Multiple Sclerosis.

This paper summarizes preliminary experiences with transdermal Histamine for MS at the Tahoma Clinic: 67 percent of 55 patients using Histamine transdermal cream had improvements in one or more areas including: Extremity Strength, Balance, Bladder Control, Fatigue, Activities Of Daily Living, and Cognitive Functioning, sustained for periods of up to three months.

One-third of patients had improvements in three or more areas of functioning. Five possible mechanisms of action are postulated:

  1. Augmentation of subnormal Cerebral tissue levels of Histamine
  2. Improved electrical function of DeMyelinated fibers
  3. Increased Cerebral blood flow
  4. Suppression of AutoImmune Responses
  5. Stimulation of ReMyelination.

These will be discussed in detail in Part II of this article.



#2

Transdermal Histamine In Multiple Sclerosis

Part Two: A proposed theoretical basis for its use
Gillson G, Wright JV, DeLack E, Ballasiotes G
Altern Med Rev 2000 Jun;5(3):224-248
Tahoma Clinic, Private practice, Nutritional Medicine, Correspondence address: Tahoma Clinic, 515 West Harrison, Kent, WA 98032
PMID# 10869103
Abstract

This paper is the companion to an earlier publication, which discussed preliminary results of transdermal Histamine use for ameliorating symptoms of both Relapsing/Remitting and Progressive Multiple Sclerosis (MS).

Here we include preliminary findings on the impairments of Digestion and Assimilation in MS patients seen in a private clinic.

Although only a small number of patients was surveyed, an association was found between Impaired Gastric Acid Production, Impaired Protein Hydrolysis, and SubNormal Plasma Histidine levels in patients with MS.

Impaired Digestion might, therefore, impair the ability of MS patients to synthesize Histamine. This paper discusses how impairment of Histamine synthesis might lead to symptoms of MS, and conversely how exogenously administered Histamine might alleviate symptoms.

Various mechanisms of action are suggested, including: enhanced Gastric Acid and Pancreatic Enzyme Secretion, augmentation of subnormal Cerebral tissue levels of Histamine, improved electrical function of DeMyelinated fibers, increased Cerebral blood flow, suppression of aberrant AutoImmune responses, and stimulation of ReMyelination.

We also discuss the observed failure of Digestive Function in MS and point out that pathological changes which parallel CNS findings have been found in the Enteric Nervous System (ENS) of patients with Parkinson's Disease.

Similar parallels might exist between the CNS and ENS (Alimentary or Digestive System) in Multiple Sclerosis.



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